Thursday, July 26, 2007

Recycling Options Abound in SF Bay Area

The San Francisco bay area offers a wealth of options for disposing of waste.
Marisa Lagos, San Francisco Chronicle, Friday, July 20, 2007

From San Francisco to Oakland to San Jose, recycling options in the region are some of the most eco-friendly available, experts say. Most cities and counties offer single-stream recycling -- you can throw all your recyclables in one bin -- and many are beginning to provide each home with a composting bin. Also, nearly all of the jurisdictions in the region have exceeded the state's mandate of a 50 percent diversion rate...

Read this complete story at http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/07/20/BAGREENBESTWORST.DTL

...and many others in the Chronicle's Green section: http://www.sfgate.com/green/

3 comments:

Sarah said...

I was looking through the "for more inspiration" links on the Northgate green blog when I saw something that we might be interested in - The Green Chamber. According to the Greenbiz website, The Green Chamber is a newly started group for green businesses that will allow members to network with other green businesses. It will also promote green principles and practices to "communities at all levels," and will provide members with selected green services, such as electronics recycling. Is this something Northgate might be interested in? The group's website is at http://www.thegreenchamber.org/ , and the Greenbiz news articles is at http://www.greenbiz.com/news/news_third.cfm?NewsID=35468 .

-Sarah

Northgate Green Team said...

Thanks, Sarah! Yes, this sounds like something Northgate would be interested in. The Green Team will investigate and let you know what we find out! Thanks again for the suggestion.

Sarah said...

I was looking again at the greenbiz site and I saw a news story about a new "green" line of paper developed by Xerox. According to the story, the green paper-making process uses 90% of the tree, as opposed to the traditional 45%, and it emits 75% less greenhouse gases than the traditional process. However, this paper is also 10% lighter than traditional paper, and aparently it yellows badly over time. The news story can be found here: http://www.greenbiz.com/news/news_third.cfm?NewsID=35531

What do you think?